» Underlayment First or Drip Edge?

Post new topic Reply to topic               Roofing/Construction Questions Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
  Post subject: Underlayment First or Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:26 pm
Posts: 2
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
Live in the Northeast where ice dams are a common occurance. Why is it that one roofer tells me ice & water shield goes over the drip edge and another says that in extreme conditions the ice & water is applied first, then the drip edge. What gives?

_________________
A bird in the hand....


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 12:12 am
Posts: 447
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
mine was done 15 yrs ago and is over the drip, now I guess they go under the drip....Read the Grace pkg and I guess this is what they say..


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:30 pm
Posts: 293
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
We have always done drip edge under on the eave and over on the rake.

_________________
Winnipeg Roofing Services.


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 11:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 14, 2010 2:33 pm
Posts: 2024
Images: 20
Location: 417-573-636-314
Post liked: 334 times
Liked posts: 366 times
Under the drip along the gutterline and over the drip on the rakelines.

_________________
The only limits in life are those you put on yourself."Go Big Or Go Home"


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 1:50 am
Posts: 203
Location: Buffalo n.y.
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
:evil:Ice and water shield is always applyed first.It has to go over the fashia board then the drip..The reason is if the gutter forms a ice dam the ice will try or will trevel under the drip edge on top of the ice shield. If you put the drip on then the ice shield it won't work because the ice will lift up the drip and hit nothing but plywood ,then your really in trouble


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject: Re: Underlayment First or Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 12:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:26 pm
Posts: 2
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
rasman6319 wrote:
Live in the Northeast where ice dams are a common occurance. Why is it that one roofer tells me ice & water shield goes over the drip edge and another says that in extreme conditions the ice & water is applied first, then the drip edge. What gives?


The consensus is under the drip on the eave and over the drip on the rakes? Why not under the drip edge on the rakes too? Wouldn't that be safer?

_________________
A bird in the hand....


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 1:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 4:36 pm
Posts: 77
Location: Lowell,MA
Post liked: 97 times
Liked posts: 6 times
I know it does not make sense, but I have personally had better luck installing it above the drip edge. I installed under the drip edge for years and after several bad winters have found that over or under, Grace or price leader ice and water, that it is far from fool proof and water still finds its way in when severe ice damns are present.


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 3:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:02 am
Posts: 54
Location: Eastern PA
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
I usually put my underlayment down first but I seen guys who put the drip edge on first. As long as you have ice and water shield on your bottom layer any nail with seal up. The only problem I have with edging first is some idiots have been using staples to fasten there drip and over time the drip is only held on by the ice and water.


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject: Re: Underlayment First or Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 6:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2007 7:10 pm
Posts: 2748
Location: N. Michigan
Post liked: 307 times
Liked posts: 269 times
rasman6319 wrote:
Live in the Northeast where ice dams are a common occurance. Why is it that one roofer tells me ice & water shield goes over the drip edge and another says that in extreme conditions the ice & water is applied first, then the drip edge. What gives?


If Ice damming is expected you should try to address the cause of the ice damming.
In this case the best way is to use a 8"-10" wide strip of I&W folded down over the facia and into the gutter on the eaves, then apply your drip edge, then apply your courses of I&W.
This will sandwich the drip edge in the I&W, you can't get any better than that.

On the rakes the underlayment goes on first and the drip edge over the top of the underlayment.
The purpose for this is so that wind driven rain does not infiltrate under the underlayment.

Pretty basic stuff guys and I'm kinda disappointed in some of you that you don't know this... :roll:

_________________
I don't need no freakin' signature, I Am Roofer.


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 6:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 8:10 pm
Posts: 80
Images: 5
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
This cracks me up. The answers actually had me questioning myself. I pulled the GAF Steep Slope field guide and double checked.

Drip over underlayment on rakes as said above and under I&W on eaves. (whew, thought I was doing it wrong.) I do agree with the post above though, I*W, then drip, then I&W would be excellent.

We've had inspectors make us pull up the bottom 3 rows if our underlayment doesn't run at least even with the drip on the eaves.


Top
 Profile Personal album  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 4:22 am
Posts: 362
Location: Seattle-Tacoma
Post liked: 1 time
Liked posts: 35 times
I have done it 3 different ways

1. Most common...I/W below rake metal and above eave metal

2. For some commercial projects they want the I/W first so that it wraps over the fascia...then the eave metal on top as well as rake over top too.

3. Same as point #2 but an addition I/W strip over the rake and eave metal. Same way you would seal in valley metal with I/W

_________________
Just Roof it man!


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 1:50 am
Posts: 203
Location: Buffalo n.y.
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
:o axium Its not expected it just happens .This year the lake is still above freezing and when it snows and draws its energy from the lake its a heavy wet snow .We got 4 feet on dec 4 5 But the right way is ice and water shield first then drip edge and if you want a strip on top of the drip edge


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject: Re: Underlayment First or Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 4:36 pm
Posts: 77
Location: Lowell,MA
Post liked: 97 times
Liked posts: 6 times
-Axiom- wrote:
rasman6319 wrote:
Live in the Northeast where ice dams are a common occurance. Why is it that one roofer tells me ice & water shield goes over the drip edge and another says that in extreme conditions the ice & water is applied first, then the drip edge. What gives?


If Ice damming is expected you should try to address the cause of the ice damming.
In this case the best way is to use a 8"-10" wide strip of I&W folded down over the facia and into the gutter on the eaves, then apply your drip edge, then apply your courses of I&W.
This will sandwich the drip edge in the I&W, you can't get any better than that.

On the rakes the underlayment goes on first and the drip edge over the top of the underlayment.
The purpose for this is so that wind driven rain does not infiltrate under the underlayment.

Pretty basic stuff guys and I'm kinda disappointed in some of you that you don't know this... :roll:

I have done it the exact way you installed with proper soffit and ridge ventilation and it has still failed. Ice and water shield is not by any means fool proof.


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 2:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2010 3:09 pm
Posts: 7
Post liked: 0 time
Liked posts: 0 time
To GUARANTEE no leaks from ice back-up - waterproofing membrane must go over fascia and behind gutter and under metal .....

Want to make the job even more secure, strip-in metal with 9" cut piece of ice / water ......

Rake Edges up to 3 feet inside interior wall should be treated same as gutter edge detail - After that if you have a good slope run it any way you desire .... But under the metal would avoid any wind driven rain issues at edges ..... And then run your felt over the metal - Once again you have the metal sandwiched between two membranes - which should eliminate any wind driven leak issues ....

But I question the use of ice /water at rake edges, we don't normally do it ..... At walls, skylights, chimneys, yea but at rake edges - haven't seen the need and we are in the Chicago Area .....

_________________
FlatRoofGuy


Top
 Profile  
 
  Post subject: Re: Underlayment First or Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 4:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2009 3:42 am
Posts: 211
Location: Windy city
Post liked: 1 time
Liked posts: 0 time
rasman6319 wrote:
Live in the Northeast where ice dams are a common occurance. Why is it that one roofer tells me ice & water shield goes over the drip edge and another says that in extreme conditions the ice & water is applied first, then the drip edge. What gives?
First gutter flashing(L flashing) along the eave,socond ice-dam protection membrane, third is underlayment, fourth is drip edge(T flashing) flashing alonge adge with nails aprx. 12 inches.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  


Disclaimer

The information and advice provided by the community are for informational purposes only. The site owner and users assume no liability for any errors or misunderstanding in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Before making any decisions or taking any action, it is recommended that you consult with a local roofing professional or building official. Roofing can be hazardous. Make sure you protect yourself by using all the appropriate safety procedures.

cron