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  Post subject: plumbing boot material
PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:19 pm 
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I am having my roof replaced and I have received conflicting information from various roofers regarding the plumbing boots.

One contractor said that lead boots will last a lifetime and are a free "upgrade", while the another said that I don't need lead boots since my pipes are PVC. Which one is correct? Would lead boots with PCV pipes cause a problem?

Thanks,
Matt


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  Post subject: Re: plumbing boot material
PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:27 pm 
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mweeks wrote:
I am having my roof replaced and I have received conflicting information from various roofers regarding the plumbing boots.

One contractor said that lead boots will last a lifetime and are a free "upgrade", while the another said that I don't need lead boots since my pipes are PVC. Which one is correct? Would lead boots with PCV pipes cause a problem?

Thanks,
Matt


I'm going to assume we are talking about a shingle roof here?

Anyway, to answer your question, lead boots will not cause a problem with your PVC pipes. However, the lead may get chewed up by squirrels. All the same, the lead is better than the pre-formed aluminum or plastic flashings that utilize a neoprene collar that is susceptible to degradation from prolonged exposure to solar radiation. In other words, the rubber boots will dry rot and crack around the pipe, and will eventually leak. With lead you just need to keep the squirrels away. Which means the best option is copper, but that is costly.

If you go with the lead, make sure to ask the contractor to install it as a two-piece flashing, this will allow the pipe and roof deck to move independently of one another without damaging the flashing. Also, make sure he is giving you code lead, not the then crap that so many contractor use because it is cheap. Generally, we are talking 4# lead for soil stack and roof drain flashings.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:29 pm 
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To add to that. If you go with the neoprene collar style they make a boot cover that covers the neoprene up so the uv does not hurt them. I would run that way if it was me.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:40 pm 
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It would certainly be easier and cheaper, but it won't last as long as lead.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 4:14 pm 
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Lifetime is a relative term.

The original lead stack here lasted approx. 90yrs.
Image

This neoprene flashing is drying and splitting after about 15 yrs. A cover like gtp suggested would have helped.
Image


"free" "upgrade" ?? Not sure what that means. A lead flashing (4lb) will likely cost 4 times more than an aluminum/neoprene flashing. Maybe this contractor is just used to doing a better job with better materials?

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 12:06 am 
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both work.
lead boot is better imo.

gweedo


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  Post subject: Neoprene boot
PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:18 pm 
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I had a 40 year shingle roof put on in 2001 and they installed the lead boots/flashing. The squirrels were eating the lead, so they came out an installed neoprene boots. Image Look at these pictures after just 7 years they are totally shot! What is the life expectancy for these boots? Shouldn't my roofer be responsible to replace these?

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 11:18 pm 
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Well, it is obvious that something went wrong in entering the pictures, but the message is the same.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:04 pm 
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They make a cover for the boots that protects it from uv rays. Its around 12 bucks and can be picked up at any local roofing warehouse or at a big box store. Therefore the neoprene will last the life of the roof. Never used lead up here in michigan so i am just saying what i have doen to stop the problem of the boot failing.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:05 pm 
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I have seen boots last 30 years i have seen boots last 5 years. Hard to say how long they will last.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 3:06 pm 
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Nope!

Personally, I would never have let them pull the lead and install the neoprene jacks. They should have just installed a second-piece lead over the damaged tops of existing lead flashings. You can stop the squirrels from chewing on your leads if you coat them with mastic, but it won't look real pretty.

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  Post subject: Neoprene boots
PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 7:08 pm 
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Thanks you folks for answering my questions. I will see that a cover boot is installed when these are replaced.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 2:13 pm 
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You guys are getting a generous amount of time if you can go 15 years before a Poly Boot / Auto-Caulk / 3-in-1 / "Oatey" fails due to heat cracking.

(I list all these names because that's what they go by here; unsure about up North... plumbers typically call 'em Oatey's because one variety is made by the same co. that does PVC glue).

In my area of Texas, these pieces of junk last about 9 to 10 years tops before dry rot sets in. Prior to the complete cracking to failure, the collar starts to contract & a white band shows around the pipe to boot joint. Plus, the paint never really holds & you start to get an ugly stack showing on the roof.

Image

Another problem (down here, anyhow) is that one of these with the plastic foot will usually suffer heat & the base tends to flex up on the corners, thereby pulling up your nails (this is especially problematic if the nails used are too short).

Image

I've never had any problems with squirrels gnawing on mine, but then that may just be good luck up 'til now.

To me, one sign of a good roofer is someone who specs lead Jacks on all their projects; 3 in 1's are for production builders & cheapskates.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:02 pm 
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I bought my house brand new about 6 years ago, and it is now time to replace my neoprene roof jacks.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:51 pm 
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The quality of the neoprene seal has a lot to do with it.
Unfortunately pipe boots are a commodity product so you never really know what you are getting.
Lead is always the same, so boring... :D

I never did like the plastic "oatey" boots, they are not "no caulk" like they say either...

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