» How to install Drip Edge?

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  Post subject: How to install Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:45 am 
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I thought I had this one clear but I saw a GAF video that said otherwise.

On the eaves, it was my understanding that you install the underlayment to the deck. Then you install the drip edge "over" the underlayment. Then you install the shingle.

The GAF "how to" video says at the eaves install the drip edge on the decking and then the underlayment....unless code says otherwise.

Which is correct?
Why would local code want it a different way than the shingle makers instructs to install?

I am so confused.

It was also mentioned to install drip edge over the underlayment on the rake. On a square "hip" roof are there rakes? Will the drip edge be visible?

Why the difference on the eave (very clear what this is) verses the rake (still confused)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:44 am 
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it should always be installed over underlayment as should all roofing and flashing material. If you want overkill strip in the flange with a 6" strip, but you dont need to.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:47 pm 
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The proper way to install drip edge is beneath the underlayment along eaves, and on top of the underlayment along rakes.

Along eaves the underlayment extends over drip edge so any water that gets past the shingles and onto underlayment drains into gutter (or off roof) and not behind the drip edge and down face of fascia board.

Along rake edges the edge of underlayment is not exposed, because it is installed beneath the drip edge.


Last edited by Cerberus on Mon Aug 09, 2010 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:06 pm 
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As Cerberus said, underlayment over the drip edge at the eaves and under the drip edge at the rakes.

Just remember that everything on a shingle roof installs just like the shingles. Everything is installed on top of or above the preceding layer.

When in doubt, look at the instructions on the package.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 2:32 pm 
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Exactly what cerberus and keepitlow said.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 3:18 pm 
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Cerb is wrong on this. Putting drip edge on bare sheathing is wrong and against common sence and W.R Grace specs. I have actually seen ice dam leaks that occured when the water wicked in between the top of the facia and bottom of the roof sheathing. You need to really understand the whole building envelope you know :wink: when in doubt read the instructions by the folks who invented Ice & water Shield.

for your further edification.

http://www.graceathome.com/pages/downlo ... S-060P.pdf

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:20 pm 
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We do it the way Cerberus described.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:51 pm 
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RooferJ wrote:
Cerb is wrong on this. Putting drip edge on bare sheathing is wrong and against common sence and W.R Grace specs. I have actually seen ice dam leaks that occured when the water wicked in between the top of the facia and bottom of the roof sheathing. You need to really understand the whole building envelope you know :wink: when in doubt read the instructions by the folks who invented Ice & water Shield.

for your further edification.

http://www.graceathome.com/pages/downlo ... S-060P.pdf


I assume you are now using I&WS as your underlayment? In that case, you want to adhere your I&WS to the roof deck and down the face of fascia board a couple of inches (where still hidden by gutter and drip edge). Then you want to install your drip edge followed by your felt underlayment which is placed over flange of drip edge at eaves. Done this way, water traveling down the felt underlayment beneath the shingles will be directed into the gutter. Likewise, ice damming and gutter overflow will be protected against by the I&WS that is installed over the wood roof deck and some of the fascia board.

However, if you are using ONLY 15# or 30# felt for underlayment, what I said the first time is the way it is supposed to be done. Remember, I live in Houston and you live up north, so people here don't use I&WS because they have to like you do.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:27 pm 
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I only install dripedge on the rakes and gutter apron on the eaves. But I install it the way cerberus said.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:19 pm 
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I always Had laid a 6 inch strip of I&W under put the drip on then a full width of ice and water to i hit the 24 inches inside the interior wall. Even on those ranches that ad a 4 or 5 foot porch i still did it. I just liked to make sure i never leaked. I spoke with my old customers i had 10 years ago when i was in business and well they still are not leaking so i must have done something right with all the snow we get.

Funny thing is i see people with heat tape all over the place on roofs, ok lets move the ice higher up the roof, think about it.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:41 pm 
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Every winter im inspecting Ice Dam issues as well as Wind Driven rain and snow issues. Most of our jobs seem to be right on the ocean so you have to know your roofing and cover your bases. The top of the facia is an achilles heel in roofing, at least up north.

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  Post subject: Re: How to install Drip Edge?
PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:22 pm 
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dadcjd wrote:
I am so confused.

It was also mentioned to install drip edge over the underlayment on the rake. On a square "hip" roof are there rakes? Will the drip edge be visible?

Why the difference on the eave (very clear what this is) verses the rake (still confused)


You can google "hip roof" and "gable roof" if you want. You will get an image of both. Right, there are NO rakes on a hip roof. Drip edge is visible, at least the part that isn't covered with shingles.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 4:04 am 
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I gotta agree with rooferj on this.I never put metal directly on the deck.I put a strip under the drip,then start with a full roll over the drip,whether it be I&W,#15,#30 whatever.Thats just how I do it,not saying anyones wrong,just makes sense to me


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 4:30 am 
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The reason its covered if you are refering to the overhang and rakes. Eaves, 1/4 min 1/2 normal. Rakes 1 inch no more. Then you can really not see if the roofer is normal it will match the shingles not the siding. Well thats the way i do it.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 10, 2010 1:34 pm 
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johnk wrote:
I gotta agree with rooferj on this.I never put metal directly on the deck.I put a strip under the drip,then start with a full roll over the drip,whether it be I&W,#15,#30 whatever.Thats just how I do it,not saying anyones wrong,just makes sense to me


If you are using I&WS and you are using more than one layer of underlayment (felt or I&WS), then it makes sense to sandwich the flange. However, if you are only using felt, the felt needs to go over the flange of drip edge at eaves.

How do I do it? Well, lets say you have a 5-inch deep gutter. On those occasions when I actually do some roofing instead of directing others, I use a full-width of I&WS along the eave and extend it down the fascia board about 4-inches (so gutter still covers it). I install the drip edge, then install 30# felt starting at the eave and covering the drip edge flange, and work my way up slope in a shingle fashion. I will also use I&WS as extra protection around roof penetrations and in valleys. My thoughts about the gutter detail is this: With the I&WS extended from the roof deck down over fascia board there will be no chance for water or ice-damming to rot out the fascia board if it gets behind the gutter. In addition, ice and water can not back up far enough to enter residence from the roof because of the I&WS on the deck along perimeter. If the shingles leak and water travels down the roof on the 30# felt underlayment (and beneath the shingles), it will be directed over the drip edge and into the gutter. I've done it this way for years and have never had a problem, because the entire edge is sealed watertight.

However, if you are ONLY using one layer of felt underlayment, the felt should be placed on top of drip edge at eaves, and beneath along the rakes in accordance with the manufacturer's and NRCA's recommendations/requirements.

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