» How do I properly flash a dormer corner?

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  Post subject: How do I properly flash a dormer corner?
PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:52 pm 
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Hi everybody,

I'm new to the list, and glad to find it. I'm in the middle of re-shingling my house. I've spent a lot of time on the Internet, looking at how to do each part of the job, researching it until I'm exhausted. I've found plenty of information on the Internet about step flashing and how to do it properly. But I've not found much information regarding how to properly flash the dormer corner. The one detailed guide I found was this:

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Home-Exterior/Roofing/roof-flashing-techniques-for-outside-corners/Step-By-Step. I used the first method mentioned, what this site calls the "wrapped corner method".

Unfortunately, it isn't working well for me. I'm using aluminum flashing and I can't get a really nice, sharply delineated crease in the flashing -- there is more of a bend, due to a slight curve in the ice and water shield below it. As such, when I wrap the flashing around the corner, it tears a little bit where the wall meets the roof. After repeated efforts, I simply filled the little rip with roofing sealant. But it is bothering me.

Is there a preferred method for corner flashing? Can anybody give me any pointers?

Thanks,
Bryan


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 9:42 pm 
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Its very simple, you use a lead piece . It wraps the corner nice and quick. use a good size piece and go easy when you bend it, you have to work it with a mallett like tool called a lead bosser ot you could use the back of your hammer or block of wood. we somtimes have locked and soldered corners made of copper for a high end job. never reley on caulk aka sealant.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 10:54 pm 
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Lead is a good choice. I use Tinner's wings most often, like thisImage

The simplified explanation is that you fold the metal over on the corner rather than cutting it tight. This keeps the large volume of flowing water off the corner. Tight cuts might look nice but they leak, cause they rely on caulk. Corners are notorious.

Some don't like the way the wing looks, but it works every time. Some also don't like having a different color flashing (lead) on the corner. They both work great, its just a personal preference.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 12:09 am 
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RooferJ wrote:
Its very simple, you use a lead piece . It wraps the corner nice and quick. use a good size piece and go easy when you bend it . . .


Thanks for the reply RooferJ. To be sure I understand your suggestion, are you suggesting that I use one piece for the whole corner? Or would I still use two pieces? I've never worked with lead flashing before. Will one piece stretch out all the way around, laying on both the wall AND roof?

Thanks,
Bryan


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 12:09 am 
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shangle_nailer wrote:
Lead is a good choice. I use Tinner's wings most often


I like this suggestion. Thanks for the tip.

-Bryan


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:55 am 
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wings wont fly here, It must be a regional thing. With a lead corner you cut a piece just like a step flashing "soaker,baby tin,etc" have it overlap your apron and then bend it around the corner a minimum of say 2 to 3". carful not to be hasty and rip it. 4lb lead is always better but sometimes hard to find. its awesome stuff and solders well also.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:56 am 
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Oh yes, remember that your counterflashing is a seperate thing. "refering to chimneys"

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 6:57 am 
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I know somethings are done diffrent in each part of the country depending on the climate. I would recomend to go to a sheetmetal shop ask them to make a bottom and top saddle (chimney,skylight) corner pieces (dormers, odd, inside corner) include your roof pitch and what type of material you want them to use and and be done. thats another way to do it since you really have no experience roofing.

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